Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Post Mill - in progress

Little bit of a hiatus on the blog, finally remedied by start of construction of a medieval post mill.


This is for a forthcoming game - an iconic HYW battle featuring a windmill (possibly two according to some sources) - and which 'The Bodkins' will be playing at the next Partizan show on 20th August. More of this anon...including my modest contribution with some newly painted figures.

The mill is a Grand Manner resin model, to which I'm adding mdf sails from the Sarissa Precision kit (as the Grand Manner ones are cast as a solid piece with no detailing on the rear). I'm considering adding partly furled cloth sails, as just the bare wooden frames don't make a windmill do what windmills do! Now on to the painting stage.


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Monday, 24 April 2017

Iconic Tree?

Another posting about a new terrain piece; one planned to complement the recent model of the church.



I found a manuscript illustration of a religious image carved into a tree trunk. I thought this would make an unusual model for my medieval scenery. The contemporary illustration appears to show the image of a saint being blessed by a bishop, after being created by a carpenter. I've not seen any other images from the period however which show a tree with an integral religious image carved in.



After I'd started the process of recreating the tree and saint, I looked more closely again at the image and it's context.  I'm now more certain that this doesn't show an icon set in a tree. I think it's more likely to portray a narrative about the process by which carpenters created wooden icons - taking a commission, carving the image in the tree before cutting it down and then finishing the piece in a workshop (destined no doubt to be placed in a religious establishment or home of a high status individual). There may be good reasons for carving the image in a standing tree, but I would have thought that it was a more difficult process, as the wood would be wet and unseasoned to carve.


The model has been made by Debris of War - who I'm pleased to say are now making some of the trees previously made by Keith Warren of Realistic Modelling Services (who's enjoying his retirement). They sent me a trunk casting, which I drilled out a space to fit an icon that was a Green Stuff press moulding from a railway scenery model I have. Debris of War then completed the tree with paint and flock, to match others I have. I'm pleased with the result and I think it'll end up within a walled graveyard base to sit alongside the church, which seems appropriate.



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Thursday, 2 March 2017

Church

This is a new addition to my collection of buildings, representing a North European village church from the fifteenth century, for use with either my HYW or later Burgundians. Thought I'd post it here as the blog's been overdue a posting.


The model is a Vollmer HO scale kit of a cathedral, but it scales up OK for a more modest sized church at 28mm (the doors are always the challenge when using smaller scale models and these look just about acceptable). It's got loads of well detailed gothic architecture and so looks just right for the fifteenth century and suitably european - whereas a lot of model railway churches look like they've been lifted across the channel from a parish in England.




The model is out of production (says 'made in West Germany' on the box, just to date it!) and I managed to purchase this one from a shop in Germany. The base part was missing when I got the kit and so thought I'd have to create one. However I contacted Vollmer and they kindly offered to press a new one in the factory and send it over to me free of charge within 2 weeks - very impressive customer service!






I've made the tower as a removable item - its tall (about 38 cms) and so is not easy to store and is also bound to get knocked when on the tabletop. As model railway kits are always a little fragile, I had to reinforce the open section at the top of the tower with metal pikes glued inside to add some rigidity and also drilled out the fancy decorations at the top of the tower and inserted a metal pin. I painted the clear plastic glazing a dark blue, after thinking long about doing some stained glass, to avoid peering inside which showed the construction. The only other change was to replace the roof sections with new sheets of tiles, as they had modern-looking skylights in them.




The priest is an old Foundry figure. I may add a separate walled graveyard at some point.




Here's some construction pics.